Should I Put My Child On My Deed?

There are many options when it comes to estate planning. These options can often seem overwhelming and unnecessary. This can feel especially true when dealing with relatively small estates.

In an attempt to avoid the estate planning process, many consider placing their children on the deed of their home. The thought is this: The home is the only asset they have of great value and this will allow the property to go to their children upon their death without dealing with the courts. It is also seen as a relatively cheap alternative to estate planning; making it even more appealing. However, under most circumstances, this is ill advised and can have disastrous consequences.

The main problems with adding a child to your deed are:

  1. Creditors
  2. Control; and
  3. Spouses


As the largest asset that most people own, a home is very valuable. It is often more than just a place to live but is used as collateral to pay for college, weddings, and/or retirement. The home is also one of the first assets creditors go after when a debt is owed. Once a child is placed on a deed, that property becomes open to that child’s creditors. Even if the child has little to no interaction with the property (i.e. does not live there or contribute to mortgage payments) creditors will still have rights over the property.

Though many believe their children to be financially stable, the future can be unpredictable. Unforeseen events, including sickness, can lead to financial instability. This instability can jeopardize your property and leave you with little choice or control. Your children’s creditors may then end up with rights to the equity you have developed, putting you into financial situations you are ill equipped to handle or recover from.


Once placed on the deed, a child will have an interest in the property. This means that they will need to sign off on any decision made by their parents; whether that is refinancing, selling or otherwise. Though for most this will only be a slight inconvenience, for some it can become more.

If a child decides they do not wish to cooperate, wish to have more control in what happens to the property or wish to gain something financially from the property, a child may have rights to do so. Though the problems may be fixable, it could cost an incredible amount of time and money in court.


We all hope that we love, or at least like, our child’s spouse and that their love lasts forever. Unfortunately, for many that is not the case. And, as a child has a degree of control over the property once they are on the deed, so will their spouse.

This control can come in the form of influence over the child or through divorce. If it does turn out that the parents do not care for the spouse, this could lead to animosity that is taken out on the property. Also, in the event of divorce, the property may be up for debate when assets are split.


It is only natural to want to find the quickest and cheapest way to accomplish your goals. However, it is important to understand the risks involved in those decisions. For most, their home is the most valuable asset they own and decisions regarding title should not be taken lightly. Always consult an Attorney prior to making decisions regarding title, to fully understand your options and the consequences of any action.

One thought on “Should I Put My Child On My Deed?

  1. What if the house is sold by the parent while the child is on the deed and all proceeds from the sale of the home went directly to the parent. Will child still be responsible for any debt that was incurred by the parent/homeowner after the sale of home.
    Parent had reversed mortgage, sold home their home and went to live with child in their home.

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