Category Archives: real estate law

What Is Owner’s Title Insurance and Why Should I Buy It?

These are both very good questions. Let’s start with the first question and then the answer to the second question will be obvious.

What is Owner’s Title Insurance? It is Insurance that insures you against losses you may suffer as a result of issues affecting the title to your property. When you are buying a property in Massachusetts usually a title examination is completed that complies with MGL Ch 93 Sec 70. Based upon the result of this search a Title Insurance Policy can be issued and a Certification of Title may be issued to you. The Certification is dealing with the record title to your property. It is provided by the law firm closing your purchase. They may also be issuing the title insurance for the transaction.

They can issue two different types of policies. The policies issued in most transactions involving the purchase of real estate are:

  1. Owner’s Title Insurance and
  2. Lenders’ Title Insurance.

The Owner’s Policy protects you and the Lender’s Policy protects your lender. The lender will make you buy their policy, but your policy is optional. Even tough your interests may coincide with that of the lender their policy only protects them in the event of a loss. This often means not until they have acquired ownership of the property. At that point you no longer have an interest in the property.

When you buy your house, you are buying more than just the structure you will live in. You are also buying the property’s legal history. All the good and bad that comes along with it. Any title issue that impacts the property is now your problem. You may be able to look to the law firm that closed your purchase to address the issue or maybe not. There are numerous problems that can impact your ownership of your property that cannot be detected by a title exam and therefore are not addressed by the Certification. These title issues may be covered by your Owner’s Title Policy.

The Owner’s Policy will insure that:

  1. You are the legal owner of the property
  2. That there are no defects, liens or encumbrances effecting your property other than those listed on your policy
  3. In the event that there is a title defect, you may be able to convey your property to a potential buyer if they are willing to accept insurable title
  4. If you are trying to refinance a loan policy may be issued

     

    Things that are covered:

  5. Forgery and impersonation;
  6. Lack of competency, capacity or legal authority of a party;
  7. Deed not joined in by a necessary party (co-owner, heir, spouse, corporate officer, or business partner);
  8. Undisclosed (but recorded) prior mortgage or lien;
  9. Undisclosed (but recorded) easement or use restriction;
  10. Erroneous or inadequate legal descriptions;
  11. Lack of a right of access; and
  12. Deed not properly recorded.

     

    Things that may also be covered depending upon the type of Owner’s Policy you purchased:

  13. Off-record matters, such as claims for adverse possession or prescriptive easement;
  14. Deed to land with buildings encroaching on land of another;
  15. Incorrect survey;
  16. Silent (off-record) liens (such as mechanics’ or estate tax liens); and
  17. Pre-existing violations of subdivision laws, zoning ordinances or CC&R’s.
  18. Post-policy forgery;
  19. Forced removal of improvements due to lack of building permit (subject to deductible);
  20. Post-policy construction of improvements by a neighbor onto insured land; and
  21. Location and dimensions of insured land (survey not required).

Your Owner’s Policy will insure the entire value of the property. It will protect you from any legal action taken against you to enforce a lien or property right to your property. The amount of your coverage may increase each year for the first five years of your policy. It is automatically added to your policy with no additional premium due from you. Your policy will protect you during your entire ownership of the property. It may even protect your heirs depending upon the type of policy you purchased.

You should want to protect what maybe the largest investment of your life anyway that you can. The purchase of Owner’s Policy is that one-time investment that should not be missed. You will have the peace of mind that no matter what the issue that comes up with your property’s title you are protected, and the title company will defend your rights. It is no surprise that your lender requires it and so should you.

New First-Time Homebuyer Loan Program from Freddie Mac. It requires a down-payment of 3%

First-Time Homebuyers have another arrow in their quiver in their attempt to slay the great monster, purchasing their first home. On April 26, 2018, Freddie Mac announced a new loan program targeted at first-Time homebuyers. It is called HomeOne. The Program requires a down payment of 3% and it is provided to otherwise qualified borrowers who are first-time homebuyers. This is not a FHA insured loan but a conventional loan. According to Freddie Mac, HomeOne will be available to borrowers commencing on July 29, 2018, so it misses this spring’s market but it will be positioned for the late summer and early fall seasons.

Freddie Mac’s release stated that “HomeOne mortgage is part of the company’s ongoing efforts to support responsible lending, provide sustainable homeownership and improve access to credit,…The HomeOne mortgage will provide our customers the flexibility they need to help borrowers anywhere in the country achieve the milestone of homeownership and overcome the common down payment resource hurdle. HomeOne is a great solution for aspiring homebuyers to grab that first rung of the property ladder and enjoy the financial and social benefits of participating in homeownership.”

The underwriting of the loans will attempt to make a complete risk assessment based on several factors. It will review credit as it applies to the capacity to repay and the value of the collateral as well as other factors. It was stated that HomeOne mortgage will be offered only for conforming fixed-rate mortgages. The loan must be secured by a single unit primary residence. Not all of the borrowers have to be a first-time homebuyer, but at least one does have to be a first-time homebuyer. According to Freddie Mac it is also adjusting the area-median-income (AMI) limits in an effort to sharpen its focus on low- and-moderate income homebuyers.

So, if you are a first-time homebuyer looking for a property, you may want to consider this loan program. It is also important to note that this is not the only program available to first-time homebuyers nor is it our firm’s endorsement of the program. You should always seek the advice of a well-informed lending professional when you are purchasing a home. Our Firm is prepared to assist first-time homebuyers in their purchase of their home in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. We want to earn your trust and have you as a client for life.

Making the Most Out of Your Power of Attorney

Present and Future Protections Against the Unknown

A Power of Attorney is a legal document in which you grant a selected person or persons the ability to act on your behalf in financial matters. This can include, but is not limited to: signing on your behalf during a sale, accessing your bank account to pay your bills, adjusting your investments, etc. As such, it is an integral part of any estate plan.

Unfortunately, with this important document come some inevitable risks. The selected person or persons will have access to and control over some of your most valuable assets. More importantly, once the access and control is given, they will be able to take actions without obtaining permission or approval; unless and until the document is revoked.

For many this is cause for concern. They worry that they are sacrificing the safety of their present assets for the sake of future protections against incapacity. And, to some extent they are correct. To protect yourself in the future, there is a certain amount of control that must be given up in the present. But, there are several ways to mitigate these risks.

Here are some of the main ways that this can be accomplished:

Select a Power of Attorney that you trust.

It is very important to think long and hard prior to selecting a person or persons as your Power of Attorney (also known as your POA). But, this choice is more than just finding someone that you can trust not to steal your hard earned money. (Though that is important.)

You should be looking for someone that you trust to make financial decisions in the same manner that you would. To do this, you must first carefully consider your beliefs/opinions/values regarding money. Then, attempt to select someone that mirrors those same beliefs/opinions/values in their own life.

It is also important to consider whether or not the POA you select can handle the responsibility of being your Power of Attorney. Handling the finances of another person can be a difficult responsibility that not everyone is capable of taking on. Carefully consider how the POA will balance their own responsibilities with your own. And, whether the POA will know when to seek assistance if the responsibility becomes too great.

Finally, it is important to make changes to your Power of Attorney Document if circumstances change. As time passes, life events may occur that give you reason to change your POA. Do not hesitate to make such changes, as you never know when you will need your Power of Attorney Document

Carefully Crafted Provisions within the Document.

Even when a POA has been carefully selected, your assets may still be vulnerable. The future is unpredictable and the person you once trusted may disappoint you. Therefore, it is important to have your Power of Attorney Document drafted to restrict the actions your POA can take.

One such provision could be a Restriction on Gift Giving. This provision would not allow your POA to make a gift of your assets to themselves. For example, should the POA wish to acquire your property, they would be forced to pay fair market value for it. Another provision could be to restriction the POA from making amendments to your Estate Plan. This could protect your Will and Trust from being amended in a way you would not have wanted.

Not all protective provisions will work in every situation. Carefully discuss your individual circumstances with your Attorney. They will be able to suggest specific provisions that will fit your needs.

Keep the Signed Power of Attorney Locked Away.

If you are still concerned regarding the safety of your assets, it may be an option to sign your Power of Attorney Document but keep it in your possession. As the signed original is required for the POA to act, without it they are powerless. You could then choose when you wish your POA to have access by simply delivering the signed document to them.

It is important to note that this course of action does not come without risk. If need arises for the POA to act, but they do not have access to the signed original, they will be powerless. If the Power of Attorney Document cannot be located or the POA does not know the document exists, it could then become necessary to petition the court for the authority to act on your behalf. A court petition could be a lengthy and costly procedure. And, it could ultimately result in a POA being selected that you would not have appointed.

Consider a Limited Power of Attorney.

This may be a good option for you if you have a specific task that you need done that you either cannot or do not want to do on your own. Often, this document is used during real estate transactions. For example, an attorney will be requested to attend a closing on behalf of a buyer or seller. In this case, the Limited Power of Attorney Document will allow the POA the ability to sign documents at the closing. Once the closing is complete, the powers granted to the POA by the Limited Power of Attorney Document cease.

Though this type of document may assist with protecting present interests by limiting the POA powers, it leaves much to be desired. A Limited Power of Attorney Document does not and cannot anticipate every need you may have in the future. Therefore, when the unexpected occurs, your POA may be left seeking court approval to handle the matter.

Consider a Springing Power of Attorney.

A Springing Power of Attorney is as all encompassing as a general Power of Attorney but it includes a specific provision that requires a certain event to occur before it becomes active. Normally, this event is incapacity.

Theoretically, this document offers the best of both worlds. You maintain sole control over your assets while you are capable then your POA can take over as soon as the activating event occurs. However, there can be significant downsides.

The significant downside and a reason why this type of Power of Attorney Document is not always recommended is the trigger event. If a need arises prior to the triggering event, a court order will be necessary. And, if the triggering event is incapacity, there can be several steps necessary to activate the Power of Attorney Document. These can include providing incapacity to a Doctor or court, which can take time that the POA may not have.

Should I Put My Child On My Deed?

There are many options when it comes to estate planning. These options can often seem overwhelming and unnecessary. This can feel especially true when dealing with relatively small estates.

In an attempt to avoid the estate planning process, many consider placing their children on the deed of their home. The thought is this: The home is the only asset they have of great value and this will allow the property to go to their children upon their death without dealing with the courts. It is also seen as a relatively cheap alternative to estate planning; making it even more appealing. However, under most circumstances, this is ill advised and can have disastrous consequences.

The main problems with adding a child to your deed are:

  1. Creditors
  2. Control; and
  3. Spouses

Creditors:

As the largest asset that most people own, a home is very valuable. It is often more than just a place to live but is used as collateral to pay for college, weddings, and/or retirement. The home is also one of the first assets creditors go after when a debt is owed. Once a child is placed on a deed, that property becomes open to that child’s creditors. Even if the child has little to no interaction with the property (i.e. does not live there or contribute to mortgage payments) creditors will still have rights over the property.

Though many believe their children to be financially stable, the future can be unpredictable. Unforeseen events, including sickness, can lead to financial instability. This instability can jeopardize your property and leave you with little choice or control. Your children’s creditors may then end up with rights to the equity you have developed, putting you into financial situations you are ill equipped to handle or recover from.

Control:

Once placed on the deed, a child will have an interest in the property. This means that they will need to sign off on any decision made by their parents; whether that is refinancing, selling or otherwise. Though for most this will only be a slight inconvenience, for some it can become more.

If a child decides they do not wish to cooperate, wish to have more control in what happens to the property or wish to gain something financially from the property, a child may have rights to do so. Though the problems may be fixable, it could cost an incredible amount of time and money in court.

Spouses

We all hope that we love, or at least like, our child’s spouse and that their love lasts forever. Unfortunately, for many that is not the case. And, as a child has a degree of control over the property once they are on the deed, so will their spouse.

This control can come in the form of influence over the child or through divorce. If it does turn out that the parents do not care for the spouse, this could lead to animosity that is taken out on the property. Also, in the event of divorce, the property may be up for debate when assets are split.

Conclusion

It is only natural to want to find the quickest and cheapest way to accomplish your goals. However, it is important to understand the risks involved in those decisions. For most, their home is the most valuable asset they own and decisions regarding title should not be taken lightly. Always consult an Attorney prior to making decisions regarding title, to fully understand your options and the consequences of any action.

Homestead Protection for Trusts

Revocable Trusts can be a good way to protect your assets from the probate process. Properly drafted and executed, assets will automatically transfer to your loved ones upon your passing. It also allows you to retain control over your assets while you are alive and gives you the ability to alter the trust as you see fit.

A common misconception regarding a Revocable Trust, however, is that they have some ability to protect your assets from creditors. It is important to know that this is not the case. Because you retain primary control of your assets, with the ability to alter the trust at any time, creditors are still able to access the assets to satisfy debts.

Fortunately for Massachusetts Residence, there is a way to protect your home from most creditors while having it in a Revocable Trust. This protection is known as the Homestead Protection Act.

The Homestead Protection Act, protects your primary residency from unsecured creditors. These creditors are, for example:

  • Someone that slips and falls on your property
  • Medical Bills
  • Credit Card Bills
  • Someone that sues you for something that happens while you are on the job
  • Someone you get into a car accident with; and
  • Many more

The Homestead automatically protects the equity in your home for up to $125,000.00. But, many Massachusetts residence own homes that are worth more than $125,000.00. For these individuals, a Homestead can be filed with the Registry of Deeds and the protection will be increased to $500,000.00. For many this is the difference between a completely protected home and a home that is vulnerable to creditors.

Before March of 2011, this protection was only available to individuals that owned their homes in their own name. Once the property was placed into trust, the protection was lost. However, in March of 2011 the Homestead Act was extended to properties held in revocable trusts if proper requirements were met. A homestead must be filed with the registry of deeds and it must state that the property is owned in trust and that the primary beneficiaries currently or intend to live in the property as their primary residency. Once this is done, your home will have the best of both worlds; the future protections of a trust and the present protections of the Homestead Protection Act.

By putting your property in trust, you are saying that you are concerned about the loved ones that you will leave behind. You are allowing your loved ones the ability to avoid the probate process and the time and money that goes along with it. It only makes sense that you would want to take this simple step to protect one of your most valuable assets while you are alive. By putting your property into a trust with a Homestead Protection, you are protecting it from both the probate process and most creditors.

Click here to read the homestead law.

Please contact Topkins & Bevans to learn more about this important protection and how to obtain it today. firm@topbev.com or bmartin@topbev.com

March 2015 Newsletter Trending Now

T&B Trending March 2015 Vol 2-2015
 

Housing Market Continues Slow Climb Toward Stable Levels

 

Source: Dsnews.com

 

The latest Multi-Indicator Market Index (MiMi) from Freddie Mac, released Wednesday, showed that the U.S. housing market showed continued stabilization for the fourth straight month in December.
Read more >>

 

 

Q4 2014 Commercial Real Estate Cycles from Dividend Capital

Source: Ted C. Jones

There is one blog topic that I write about quarterly that is preceded by several calls and emails as to when it is scheduled to be available – The Cycle Monitor – Real Estate Market Cycles from Dividend Capital, prepared by Dr. Glenn Mueller from the University of Denver. Read more >>

 

FHA launches historic homebuyer ‘care package’ for 2015

 

Source: Inman.com

 

After several years of lackluster participation in the housing market, first-time homebuyers are getting a boost from the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) this year.
Read more >>

 

March 2015 Newsletter Trending Now

 

Source: Topkins & Bevans Blog

 

This is the time of the year when all of us have no choice but to pour through our bank statements, credit card statements, checks and acknowledgments from charities regarding contributions….. While you are going through this data-producing exercise, you might want to consider your Will, and other elements of your Estate Plan, at the same time.
Read more >>

 

Topkins & Bevans

Offices in

Boston, Braintree and Waltham

rbevans@topbev.com

www.topkinsandbevans.com

Tax Time Considerations: Estate Plan? Yes

This is the time of the year when all of us have no choice but to pour through our bank statements, credit card statements, checks and acknowledgments from charities regarding contributions. Whether you prepare your own tax returns, or have a professional assist you, the first step is always to gather together data from the past year and assemble it into a form which will permit the preparation of an accurate tax return.

While you are going through this data-producing exercise, you might want to consider your Will, and other elements of your Estate Plan, at the same time. While your Estate Planning documents focus more on whom you would want to take charge of your assets, and to whom, and in what amounts you wish your assets to be distributed, preparation for getting your Estate Plan in shape is not that much different from getting your tax information together. Perhaps, you have an Estate Plan, but it was executed many years ago and the people you selected to serve as executors and trustees, or health care agents, are no longer living or have moved away. Maybe, your children have achieved a level of maturity where you can trust them to take care of things when you are no longer able. Maybe you have developed a relationship with a bank, or other financial institution, which you are comfortable with, and whom you want to get involved.

The point is just like your tax returns take some effort to gather information; your Estate Plan requires the same type of thinking and assembling. It matters not that you have located all the information concerning your income for 2014, if you do not get same on the return; you are in jeopardy with Federal and Massachusetts tax-collecting authorities. Similarly, even if you have located your old Will or Trust, your wishes will not be served unless you make the effort to meet with an attorney and inform him or her whom you want to be in charge, and to whom your assets should be distributed. Sometimes, all you need to do is “tweak” your current Will or Trust with a Codicil or Trust Amendment. Other times, you may need to prepare entirely new instruments, because the ones you have in place are so “dated”.

If you are one of that majority of Americans who have no Will or Trust in place, AT ALL, tax time may be the time that you climb off the fence and stop procrastinating with your family’s future. You really owe it to your spouse and children to put down in writing to whom you want your assets distributed, and which people you want involved in making it happen. Not everyone in your family will be happy with your choices, but no one will be able to say “Mom would have wanted this” or “Dad would have wanted that”. You do not have to rely on the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to distribute your wealth. You will have made it perfectly clear what you want.

First-time homebuyers given more options to buy a home by FannieMae and FreddieMac:

Earlier this week new lending guidelines for first-time homebuyers were released in a statement by the FHFA Director Melvin L. Watt . Watt wrote “The new lending guidelines released today by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will enable creditworthy borrowers who can afford a mortgage, but lack the resources to pay a substantial down payment plus closing costs, to get a mortgage with 3 percent down.

The lower down-payment requirement will allow more first-time homebuyers the opportunity to buy a home. Often the greatest hurdle for the first-time homebuyer is saving enough for a down payment. Many first-timers would try to save 20% of the purchase price that many lenders required. It can take a significant period of time to save that large amount of a down-payment forcing first-timers to wait to buy a home. Right now with rates as low as they are it very well may be cheaper to buy than rent.

FannieMae in its statement regarding its My Community Mortgage® “announced an option for qualified first-time homebuyers that will allow for a down payment as low as three percent. …the 97 percent loan-to-value ratio (LTV) option will expand access to credit for qualified first-time homebuyers that may not have the resources for a larger down payment.” Other requirements will still have to be met by the first-timer. These include “the usual underwriting, income documentation and risk management standards. These loans will require private mortgage insurance or other risk sharing, as is required on purchase loans acquired by the company with greater than 80 percent LTV.”

FannieMae expressed its hope that “Our new 97 percent LTV offering is simply one way we are working to remove barriers for creditworthy borrowers to get a mortgage. We are confident that these loans can be good business for lenders, safe and sound for Fannie Mae and an affordable, responsible option for qualified borrowers.”

FannieMae will require for this program that at least one of the borrowers be a first-time homebuyer.

FreddieMac also provided its guidelines for the low down-payment program. The program is entitled “Home Possible Advantage”

FreddieMac also set forth its Key Facts:

  • Home Possible Advantage offers qualified low- and moderate-income borrowers a conforming conventional mortgage with a maximum loan-to-value ratio of 97 percent.
  • Home Possible Advantage mortgages can be used to buy a single unit property or for a “no cash out” refinance of an existing mortgage.
  • First time homebuyers must participate in an acceptable borrower education program, like Freddie Mac’s CreditSmart®, to qualify for Home Possible Advantage.
  • Home Possible Advantage mortgages are available as 15-, 20-, and 30-year fixed rate mortgages.

These programs are seeking to allow the first-time homebuyer the ability to buy a home with less of a down payment but also limit the risk that the loan will go bad or default. They are focusing on the borrowers’ credit worthiness as opposed to the size of their down-payment. There is always an element of risk with requiring a lower down-payment; the homeowner has less of their own money at risk. But when you balance this against the economic drag of so many potential buyers sitting on the sidelines the benefit of pulling pull them into the real estate market may outweigh that risk.

We offer reduced rates for first-time homebuyers. Contact if you are thinking about buying a home. We will provide you with over a century of experience in dealing with real estate.

Massachusetts Court of Appeals rules that a deed notarized improperly is unenforceable?

The Massachusetts Appeals Court in Allen V. Allen ruled that a deed signed by a grantor but not acknowledged by the grantor before a notary was not enforceable. This was family transaction involving the family home in Lexington. The matriarch of the family Ethel began the process of moving from her Lexington home to live with one of her daughters, Nancy in 2001. Ethel’s son Harold claims that a deed from Ethel executed on July 23, 2001, conveyed the house to him and Ethel as joint tenants. This deed is the subject of the litigation. An Attorney prepared the deed and notarized it. The acknowledgement (notary) was dated July 23, 2001, and it read: “Then personally appeared the above named Ethel M. Allen and acknowledged the foregoing instrument to be her free act and deed, before me”. The attorney then recorded the deed on August 10, 2001.

Later that year, on November 30, 2001, Ethel established the Allen Realty Trust and executed a deed conveying the Lexington property to herself and to her daughter Deborah as co-trustees of the Trust, reserving a life estate for herself. Ethel specified in the trust that the property would be sold upon her death and the proceeds divided among several of her descendants, including Deborah. This deed was recorded on February 8, 2002. Ethel died on December 20, 2009. It was at this time that Harold revealed the July 23, 2001, deed. Neither Deborah nor her sister Nancy nor the attorney who prepared the November deed had discovered Harold’s deed. When the second deed was recorded no title examination was done. Deborah commenced a litigation in January of 2010. Her suit disputed Harold’s claim to the property and sought to declare the deed to him was unenforceable.

The judge at the trial found that Ethel’s signature on the July deed was authentic. But he determined that Ethel never appeared before the attorney/notary to acknowledge the deed. The judge found that Ethel had signed the deed in front of Harold; he then brought it to attorney/notary for his signature, and then the attorney had notarized the deed without Ethel in his presence.

The Land Court ruled that the deed was unenforceable because it was improperly notarized. It was not sufficient that Ethel had signed the deed. She had not confirmed before the notary that the deed had been her free act and deed. The deed because of the invalid acknowledgement was not entitled to be recorded as the Registry of Deeds. The Court stated “We therefore conclude that the latent defect in the certificate of acknowledgment of the July deed prevented it from giving constructive notice to Deborah of the prior conveyance.” The Appeals Court affirmed the Land Court’s findings in its decision.

There were other arguments made by Harold which all also failed. Always remember that a document cannot be notarized unless you are in the presence of the notary when you execute it or when you acknowledge that your signature was your free act and deed. Also whenever you have a document conveying an interest in real estate recorded, have the title checked for any other matters first and then record your document.

Fixed Fees for purchase and sale work—an idea whose time has come

When I first started practicing law, it was accepted practice to bill matters by the hour. After all, the only thing I was selling was my time, and if I spent more time on a matter than I expected, why shouldn’t the client compensate me for that effort? While these axioms remain true, the marketplace has changed, and consumers are now aware that “shopping” for an attorney is no different than shopping for any other service or commodity. Because of these trends, and because I want everyone I represent to believe they have been well served and fairly charged for services, my firm now uses a “fixed fee” approach to almost all real estate transactions. My practice is to enter into an initial discussion with the client to determine the level of complexity of the transaction, and then to agree upon a fee, which will not change even if the transaction goes viral, and I spend more time on the matter than anticipated.

Accordingly, if you work with Topkins & Bevans for the purchase or sale of your home, you will know, up front, what the matter will cost you, and you can factor that expense into your budgeting process.

There are several inherent advantages to this approach:

  1. You and our firm establish a relationship of TRUST, our most important product.

If you believe that you are working with honorable professionals, you will feel comfortable telling your friends and family about us, and that helps Topkins & Bevans to expand our client base. You may also feel comfortable using our firm for other legal matters which may arise, including helping you develop an Estate Plan for your family.

  1. You are not hesitant to email or call when you have a question.

Many people worry about calling when the meter is “on”. They have concerns, but they do not want to expand the amount of their legal fee. Fixed fee billing eliminates that factor from the equation. When the pressure is off, people communicate better. On the other hand, the situations are few and far between where a client takes unfair advantage of the fixed fee approach.

  1. We get all the information from you that we need to give you appropriate representation.

Our firm has real estate experience at almost every level. We have completed condominium conversions. We have prepared subdivisions. We are familiar with current lending practices. None of this expertise will help you unless we know all the facts of your situation. When you are not worried about the added cost, you can open up and give us good information. That usually translates to our being able to give you effective representation.

If you are considering buying or selling a home, we would love to hear from you. We will work with you on a fixed fee basis and even defer payment of some, or all, of your fee until the closing. There is nothing better in our line of work than a satisfied client, and that is what we aim for, each and every time.